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![Habanera Riff](../images/tutorial/articles/A.07-bizet/habanera.png)
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After our brief excursion to the fantastic world of coding Minecraft with Sonic Pi last month, let's get musical again. Today we're going to bring a classical operatic dance piece straight into the 21st century using the awesome power of code.
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Outrageous and Disruptive
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Let's jump into a time machine back to the year 1875. A composer called Bizet had just finished his latest opera Carmen. Unfortunately like many exciting and disruptive new pieces of music people initially didn't like it at all because it was too outrageous and different. Sadly Bizet died ten years before the opera gained huge international success and became one of the most famous and frequently performed operas of all time. In sympathy with this tragedy let's take one of the main themes from Carmen and convert it to a modern format of music that is also too outrageous and different for most people in our time - live coded music!
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Decoding the Habanera
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Trying to live code the whole opera would be a bit of a challenge for this tutorial, so let's focus on one of the most famous parts - the bass line to the Habanera:
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![Habanera Riff](../images/tutorial/articles/A.07-bizet/habanera.png)
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This may look extremely unreadable to you if you haven't yet studied music notation. However, as programmers we see music notation as just another form of code - only it represents instructions to a musician instead of a computer. We therefore need to figure out a way of decoding it.
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Notes
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The notes are arranged from left to right like the words in this magazine but also have different heights. *The height on the score represents the pitch of the note.* The higher the note on the score, the higher the pitch of the note.
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In Sonic Pi we already know how to change the pitch of a note - we either use high or low numbers such as `play 75` and `play 80` or we use the note names: `play :E` and `play :F`. Luckily each of the vertical positions of the musical score represents a specific note name. Take a look at this handy look up table:
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![Notes](../images/tutorial/articles/A.07-bizet/notes.png)

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A.07-bizet.md:29
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3 years ago
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etc/doc/lang/sonic-pi-tutorial-el.po, string 1460
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