Source Context Failing checks
<emphasis>TOOL</emphasis> Samba

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The translations in several languages have failing checks

<primary>Samba</primary>

Multiple failing checks

The translations in several languages have failing checks

<primary>Zeroconf</primary>

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The translations in several languages have failing checks

<primary>Bonjour</primary>

Multiple failing checks

The translations in several languages have failing checks

<primary>Avahi</primary>

Multiple failing checks

The translations in several languages have failing checks

<primary>AFP</primary>

Multiple failing checks

The translations in several languages have failing checks

<primary>AppleShare</primary>

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The translations in several languages have failing checks

<primary>AppleTalk</primary>

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<primary>migration</primary>

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The translations in several languages have failing checks

<primary><command>nmap</command></primary>

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The translations in several languages have failing checks


<computeroutput>$ </computeroutput><userinput>nmap mirwiz</userinput>
<computeroutput>Starting Nmap 6.47 ( http://nmap.org ) at 2015-03-24 11:34 CET
Nmap scan report for mirwiz (192.168.1.104)
Host is up (0.0037s latency).
Not shown: 999 closed ports
PORT STATE SERVICE
22/tcp open ssh

Nmap done: 1 IP address (1 host up) scanned in 0.13 seconds</computeroutput>

Multiple failing checks

The translations in several languages have failing checks

Backing up the Configuration

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The translations in several languages have failing checks

The <filename>sources.list</filename> file is often a good indicator: the majority of administrators keep, at least in comments, the list of APT sources that were previously used. But you should not forget that sources used in the past might have been deleted, and that some random packages grabbed on the Internet might have been manually installed (with the <command>dpkg</command> command). In this case, the machine is misleading in its appearance of “standard” Debian. This is why you should pay attention to any indication that will give away the presence of external packages (appearance of <filename>deb</filename> files in unusual directories, package version numbers with a special suffix indicating that it originated from outside the Debian project, such as <literal>ubuntu</literal> or <literal>lmde</literal>, etc.)

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The translations in several languages have failing checks

<emphasis>QUICK LOOK</emphasis> <emphasis role="pkg">cruft</emphasis>

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The translations in several languages have failing checks

Architecture(s)

Unpluralised

The string is used as plural, but not using plural forms

DEC Unix (OSF/1)

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The translations in several languages have failing checks

alpha, mipsel

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The translations in several languages have failing checks

z/OS, MVS

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The translations in several languages have failing checks

Ultrix

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The translations in several languages have failing checks

i386, alpha, ia64, mipsel

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The translations in several languages have failing checks

Windows Vista / Windows 7 / Windows 8

Multiple failing checks

The translations in several languages have failing checks

<primary>amd64</primary>

Multiple failing checks

The translations in several languages have failing checks

<primary>i386</primary>

Multiple failing checks

The translations in several languages have failing checks